Summary

My research focuses on climate adaptation and urban resilience, in particular thermal and air quality performance of buildings and neighborhoods, occupant behavior modeling, and green infrastructure. In my work, I explore human-building interactions under environmental pressures from a data-driven perspective, utilizing modeling and information visualization tools with the objective of understanding how to improve conditions for vulnerable populations.

DISSERTATION: HEAT WAVES IN SENIOR PUBLIC HOUSING SITES

Heat waves are among the deadliest natural disasters and their impacts on urban areas and populations are more evident in sites of lower socio-economic status and poor indoor/outdoor living conditions. In my dissertation, I examine the thermal and air quality conditions in senior public housing sites during heat waves. My approach investigates the joint effect of site amenities, building characteristics and occupant actions on thermal comfort and indoor air quality through a social-ecological systems framework, to identify cost-effective strategies that can assist low-income seniors in coping with heat. ​

This research is funded by NSF grant AGS-1645786.

INTERVENTIONS TO IMPROVE IAQ IN LOW-INCOME HOUSING

Given that people spend most of their time indoors, the quality of indoor environments is important for their health and well-being. In this work, we focus on indoor air quality and collect evidence on the environmental, physical and social factors affecting selected indoor pollutants. We find that those factors vary by location and socio-economic status, and that the role of residents and local organizations is vital in the case of low-income communities, where resources are limited. We conclude by synthesizing a socio-technical systems framework to offer a list of interventions that target low-income housing.

This research is funded by Rutgers University CDHW-IRG.

 

Past Projects